How to stay positive during hardships?

Beating the tough time with the courage and patience is an actual bravery. People who do not despair in the hard times and remain focused have remarkable qualities. Indeed when tough challenges hit, it either define you or destroy you. But good thing is hardships does help us to value the ease.

Today, I like to share few incidents from the life of Prophet Muhammad ﷺ to highlight how he acted during distressful circumstances. So that it help you to stay positive and keep your spirits high insha’Allah.

Be with me!

Abu Talib’s Death

It was the 10th year of Prophethood. Things in Makkah were returning to normal after the long social economical boycott of Banu Hashim. Historians report that the Quresh instated a stifling boycott on muslims for approximately three years in Makkah. Only when this confinement ended, muslims took a sigh of relief.

Prophet’s uncle and his caretaker Abu Talib suffered heavily through this trial and got ill. He was 70 years old. The hardships of the siege had weakened his health. The Makkans took it as an opportunity to speak about Muhammad ﷺ. In his last moments, some notables from Quresh like Abu Jahl and Abdullah bin Abi Umayyah visited him. They were well aware of the bond between the Prophet ﷺ and his uncle. They were hoping that the Prophet would listen to his uncle’s dying wishes but no settlement occurred among them. The leaders were reluctant to accept Islam and Prophet ﷺ was clear in his beliefs. The Prophet ﷺ tried that they embrace Islam and persuaded Abu Talib till his last breath.

“My uncle, just make a profession that there is no true god but Allah, and I will bear testimony before Allâh (of your being a believer)”. (Al-Mubarakpuri, 2003)

Sorrowfully, he insisted on his ancestors’ faith and eventually died in the state of disbelief. One can only imagine the grief of Prophet ﷺ not only for his loss, but also on Abu Talib’s denial of the truth. Out of the deep emotions, the Messenger of Allah ﷺ remarked:

“By Allah, I will persistently beg pardon for you till I am forbidden to do so (by Allah)”. (Al-Mubarakpuri, 2003)

It was then that this verse was revealed in Quran (9:113):

“It is not (proper) for the Prophet and those who believe to ask Allah’s forgiveness for the Mushrikeen (polytheists, idolaters, pagans, disbelievers in the Oneness of Allah) even though they be of kin, after it has become clear to them that they are the dwellers of the Fire (because they died in a state of disbelief).”

And it was said to the Prophet ﷺ:

“ Verily! You [O Muhammad ] guide not whom you like.” (Quran, 28:56)

Nevertheless, Abu Talib was the tower of defense against the arrogant Quresh. He did not let Quresh “isolate” Prophet ﷺ.  Everyone knew his death meant the loss of political protection for his nephew and for Muslims. It was a 40-year long selfless relationship, the love and care he showed to Prophet ﷺ and Muslims is admirable.

Shortly after, Abu Lahab became the chief of Abu Talib’s tribe whose hatred and enmity towards believers was not hidden from anyone. Initially he abided by the wishes of the clan in protecting Muhammadﷺ, but quickly reverted to his former enmity. With this development, the persecution, insult and disrespect of the messenger by people of the city reached to a higher level. There were many disgraceful, unprovoked acts that Prophet ﷺ patiently endured in this difficult time. Regardless, he continued his mission and kept calling people to the oneness of Allah.

Khadija’s R.A Death

Just two months after the death of his uncle, another calamity struck the Prophet. His beloved companion, loving wife, and mother of his children, Khadijah R.A passed away. Sadly, this time Prophet ﷺ lost the central pillar of his household, the love of his life. His internal strength was stricken with this trial. For 25 years, they shared companionship of each other. She was 65 years old at the time of her death and Prophet ﷺ was 50. These were the gloomy, grim days for the family of the Messenger. Khadija bint Khuwaylid was the first lady to believe in his dawah and stood bravely by him in all-critical situations. His spiritual companion with a pure heart, mind and soul who always comforted his agony was gone. She was his best person, who used to alleviate his sufferings and always raise his morale. May Allah SWT be pleased with her; and may He reward her best recompense. Ameen


Allah SWT exemplifies Prophet Muhammad ﷺ for the whole mankind. So as a result, the important part is to learn from his life and character.

  • His trials and difficulties were not small, but even at that time, he did not forget to trust Allah SWT. As Allah the Almighty revealed these verses:

“And rely upon the Ever-Living who does not die, and exalt [Allah] with His praise. And sufficient is He to be, with the sins of His servants, Acquainted”   (Quran, 25:58)


  • Optimism is the key to handle odd situations. Prophet’s life is a proof that he was a fountain of optimism. No matter, how grief struck him, how heart-broken Prophet ﷺ was from the behavior of enemies, he did not discontinue his mission.
  • Prophet ﷺ endured the loss of his beloved ones with utmost patience. As he knew Allah SWT says in the Quran:

And We will surely test you with something of fear and hunger and a loss of wealth and lives and fruits, but give good tidings to the patient”. (Quran, 2:155)

  • Because of these and similar incidents, no one could assert that Islam succeeded with the help of a particular person, but rather it was due to Allah’s help and protection as He is the best Disposer of all affairs.

Thus, as believers, we should remain patient and submissive in all conditions with the decree and commandments of Allah SWT, no matter how difficult things are, no matter who comes in and goes away from our lives, we should always remember and affirm with our tongue and heart by saying,

“… Indeed we belong to Allah, and indeed to Him we will return.” (Quran, 2:156)


Al-Mubarakpuri, Saifur Rahman (2003). “The Year of Grief ” The Sealed Nectar [Ar-Raheeq Al-Makhtum]. Lahore: Darussalam

Al-Qur’an al-Kareem. (n.d.). Retrieved June 29, 2017, from

Fathima, A. (2014, October 18). Asfia’s Blog! Retrieved July 02, 2017, from

Rahman, Adam. (n.d.). The Greatest Man of All Time: A Mercy to The World (Limited ed.). Awake iRevival.

Sayings and Teachings of Prophet Muhammad ﷺ. (n.d.). Retrieved June 29,2017, from

Year of Sorrow. (2017, June 19). Retrieved June 29, 2017, from


Role of Muslim women in the development of the Islamic sciences

“In the Name of Allah, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful”

An African proverb says, “Educate a boy and we educate one person. Educate a girl and we educate a family, a whole nation.”

Islam stresses education more than any other religion and considers it an essential right of every human without discriminating on the basis of gender. Women’s education is as important as men’s for the sustainability and progress of a society. The world is surprised to find that there are many Muslim women scholars who played an active role in the intellectual and social development of Muslim communities. Although the role of women scholars in Hadith Sciences is highlighted, studies show that women also contributed significantly to fields like theology, jurisprudence, literature, technology, calligraphy, medicine and many crafts that we recognize and admire as Islamic. Below is an overview of the contributions made by female Muslim scholars over the Islamic period.

Early Islamic Era: From the earliest days of Islam, women played a vital role in preservation and cultivation of Hadith. They attended prayers and sermons in Prophet’s ﷺ mosque and learnt from him in public gatherings. After his death, Sahabah used to approach Ummhat-ul-Momineen who never felt shy to guide them with their knowledge. In this regard, names of A’ishah , Hafsah, Umm Habibah, Maymunah, Umm Salamah, and Safiyah bint Huyay are renowned (May Allah be pleased with all of them, Ameen). A’ishah R.A has an eminent place in the Islamic history as a major narrator of ahadith. She praised Ansari women for being open to asking issues related to women that keep benefiting the Ummah. Other female companions of Prophet ﷺ also left their mark in history. Among the successors, women remained dynamic contributors to the Muslim civilization. Umm-ud-Darda Sughrah (Death: 81/700 CE) was a taba’iyyah (who was Muslim follower and contemporary of sahaba and born after Prophet’s ﷺ death) and a prominent jurist from Damascus of the 7th century who is considered to be superior to prominent hadith scholars like Ibn Sireen and Hasan al-Basari. She was fiqh teacher of caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan. Hafsah bint-Sireen [1] learned many ahadith from sahabi Anas ibn Maalik and was very proficient in Tafseer and Quran recitation. A’bida Al-Madaniyah (8th-century scholar) was a freed slave and wife of the Spanish hadith scholar Habib Duhan. She had a prominent place by memorizing traditions from great hadith scholars of Madina and related more than 10,000 ahadith on the authority of her teachers [2]. Fatima Al-Batayahiyyah [3] was a well-known scholar of the 8th century and taught Sahih Bukhari in Damascus. Leading male scholars of the time came from afar to attend her lectures. A’ishah bint Sa’d bin Abi Waqas, daughter of the famous Sahabi, was so learned that Imam Malik, Hakim ibn Utaybah, and Ayyub as Sakhtiyani were among her students.Read More »


We have a very wrong understanding of the meaning of Halal slaughter. I was asked by a Non-Muslim professor once. What makes a meat halal? And I didn’t know an explanation and I was embarrassed. But I gave a vague answer saying that we say the prayer before we cut, that makes it Halal.

Later, I came back and went through many hadiths and articles written by Muslim scholars and finally came to an understanding. I am going to explain it in a scientific way so that InshaAllah in the future you will be prepared if anyone asks you the same.


Answer: It is the undrained blood that contaminates the meat, which makes it Haram.

What non-muslim butchers do is completely CHOP OFF the head as a result of which the Connection between the Brain and the Heart is LOST hence the Heart stops Pumping/Beating almost instantaneously. Therefore there is no driving Force to PUSH the blood OUT of the body. As a result of this, the blood STAGNATES in the veins and arteries and Contaminates the meat.

Scientifically Blood is one of the Best culture mediums to grow bacteria.

Consuming meat contaminated with blood makes humans more vulnerable to infections and joint pains. (Joint pains because of high uric acid levels in blood)


Answer: We DO Not Chop off the head completely, instead we CUT the Main Vein (jugular vein) in the neck first. This vein contains venous blood in high pressure and it directly connects to the atrium of the heart without any interference. This method of slaughtering preserves the connection between the brain and the heart which allows neural transmissions to be delivered. This keeps the heart pumping/beating until all the blood is drained off completely from every vein and artery in the body making the meat PURE and thus halal. SUBHANALLAH!!


Allah SWT has created Fish🐟 in such a way that the moment it is removed from water the Entire Blood in its body is redirected to a part called the Epiglottis in its mouth which turns bright red thus indicating that the blood is drained and the meat is pure. SUBHANALLAH!!

Originally shared by Sisters Islam Query

The Lost Female Scholars of Islam

At the time Eileen Collins became the first woman to command the space shuttle, some Muslims were debating the right of women to drive a car on the road. This disparity in the level of public discourse on the rights of women and role of women confront Muslim societies. New findings by a scholar at Oxford on the historical role of women may help Muslims forge a new perspective but still remain true to the Prophetic traditions. Mehrunisha Suleman and Afaaf Rajbee report.

If you call a man a thief long enough, he will start to think he really is a thief. Likewise, if you call a child stupid all the time, she will grow up thinking s/he really is stupid. This swindle of self-perception describes the deep seated anxiety surrounding women in Islam. The sustained media and academic portrayal of Islam has been that of a sexist, patriarchal religion that subjugates women through implicit assumptions of their inferiority. The corrective efforts to this perceived sexism have been shaped by conservatism and radicalism alike. Muslim feminists throw women forward as the bastion of a new, gender-less Islam, free from the shackles of male scholarship and propelling them forth to become imams and state leaders. At the same time, one can find countless imams from the Asian subcontinent who will readily declare women’s rights as a pernicious Western import, against which the best defence is to keep them inside the home and away from places of work and education. In this way, there may be little that separates misogynistic mullahs from progressive feminists: both are reactions to a crisis of confidence in their own faith. The social and political upheavals of the past c e n t u r y h a v e shaken the ummah to the very core – to the point that commentators cannot seem to defend the most basic social relationship between men and women. Amidst these celebrations and condemnations of Islam’s supposed misogynism, Shaykh Mohammad Akram Nadwi’s study of Al Muhaddithat: the women scholars of hadith is a timely reminder that the gender issue need not be a problem in Islam. The portrayal in the media of Islam as the cause of the subordination of women was a key inspiration for the Shaykh to embark on his decade long study. Currently a research fellow at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, he found himself confronted with disagreements amongst Muslims about their own history. There was a gaping need to seek out the real historical record on women’s place in the Islamic tradition.

There are widely cited arguments that the male gender bias in Islamic scholarship has affected the interpretations of the Qur’an and hadith. But the historical records show examples of fatwas issued by male jurists that were materially adverse to men and in favour of women. Furthermore, many of the testaments of excellent female scholarships have been recounted by their male students. Imam Dhahabi noted that amongst female narrators of hadith, there were none found to be fabricators. Women’s scholarly integrity and independence were unimpeachable. Naturally, any sexist male would have a problem admitting to these facts. Since women today participate so little in the teaching of Hadith and the issuing of fatwas, there is a wide misconception that historically they have never played this role. As Shaykh Akram describes, “when I started, I thought there may be thirty to forty women,” but as the study progressed, the accounts of female scholars kept growing and growing, until eventually there were no less than 8,000 biographical accounts to be found. Such vast numbers truly testify to the huge role that women have played in the preservation and development of Islamic learning since the time of the blessed Prophet Muhammad. The women encountered by Shaykh Akram were far from mediocre when compared to men, indeed, some excelled far beyond their male contemporaries. There were exceptional women who not only actively participated in society but also actively reformed it. Most striking was the high calibre of their intellectual achievements and the respect that they received for this.

Apart from well-known figures, including Ayesha Siddiqa, the daughter of Abu Bakr, the grandeur of forgotten scholars is rekindled in the work. Fatima Al Batayahiyyah, an 8th century scholar taught the celebrated work of Sahih al Bukhari in Damascus. She was known as one of the greatest scholars of that period, demonstrated especially during the Hajj when leading male scholars of the day flocked from afar to hear her speak in person. A beautiful picture is painted of her in an Islam that has been long forgotten – a distinguished, elderly woman teaching her students for days on end in the Prophet’s mosque itself. Whenever she tired, she would rest her head on the Prophet’s grave and continue to teach her students as the hours wore on. A n y w o m a n visiting the Prophet’s mosque now will know the frustration of not even being able to see the blessed Prophet’s grave, let alone rest their head on its side wall.

Another, Zainab bint Kamal, taught more than 400 books of Hadith in the 12th century. Her “camel loads” of texts attracted camel loads of students. She was a natural teacher, exhibiting exceptional patience which won the hearts of those she taught. With such a towering intellectual reputation, her gender was no obstacle to her teaching in some of the most prestigious academic institutes in Damascus.

Then there was Fatimah bint Muhammad al Samarqandi, a jurist who advised her more famous husband on how to issue his fatwas. And Umm al-Darda, who as a young woman, used to sit with male scholars in the mosque. “I’ve tried to worship Allah in every way,” she wrote, “but I’ve never found a better one than sitting around debating with other scholars.” She became a teacher of hadith and fiqh and lectured in the men’s section. One of her students was the caliph of Damascus. The sheer hard work and dedication to Islam by these women is unfathomable by standards today – but they also had some biological advantages against men. Female muhaddi that were often sought after by students to learn hadith because of their longer lifespan – which shortened the links in the chains of narration. Although Shaykh Akram’s study focuses on the narrators of Hadith, he found that women s c h o l a r s had also contributed significantly in teaching “theology, logic, philosophy, calligraphy and many of the crafts that we recognise and admire as Islamic.”

The presence of female teachers alone does not do justice to the importance of women in Islamic history. The Qur’an, as originally recorded on parchments and animal bones, was entrusted to Hafsah, daughter of Umar. It was with the help of these preserved records that Caliph Uthman disseminated six standardised versions of the Qur’an to the major political and cultural centres in the Islamic realm. He ordered all non-standardised editions to be burned, an act that indicates the immense trust in Hafsah’s competence and character. The validity of women’s teachings was never doubted by the Companions on account of their gender, or by any respected scholar since.

Considering Islam’s teachings on the fundamental equality of men and women, Shaykh Akram’s work should really be no surprise. The Prophet taught that there is no difference in worth between believers on account of their gender. Both have the same rights and duties to learn and teach – from memorising and transmitting the words of the Qur’an and Hadith to the interpretation of these sources and giving counsel to fellow Muslims through fatwas (legal opinions). Women have the same duty as men to encourage the good and restrain the evil. It follows quite logically from this that if they cannot become scholars and be capable of understanding, interpreting and teaching, they cannot fulfil their duty as Muslims. If the subjugation of women is not the result of Islamic teachings, then why are there such gross violations of women’s rights in the Muslim world today? Relegating the Muslim woman only to the role of a mother and housewife is a relatively modern phenomenon (didn’t Ayesha lead an army and didn’t Umm Salama avert a crisis at Hudaybiyyah?). The definitive cause to this complex and multi-faceted problem is heavily debated, but a few contributing factors are worth tracing here. The hegemony of Western civilisation in the modern world brings with it an inevitability that the Muslim world will fall victim to its own weaknesses. Women have always had a problematic position in the Judeo-Christian tradition, the most obvious example being the Biblical account of Adam and Eve’s fall from the Garden. The source of mankind’s original sin is placed squarely on Eve, who represents the weaker sex in the parable (the pains of childbirth have traditionally been regarded as atonement for this original sin in the Christian faith).

Theological precedents aside, the equality of men and women has come late in the day to Western Europe, with the status of women as “human” being debated in the 16th century and equal legal rights to men only being established by the 19th and 20th centuries. Misogynism was internationalised, as Aisha Bewley, writer and translator of the Qur’an describes, by western colonial authorities who excluded women from teaching in mosques and assuming political roles in the Muslim societies they colonised. “The lens through which the West viewed Muslim women was already a distorted one – and o n c e imposed or implanted among the Muslims, this viewpoint gradually became an established norm.” As the technologically and scientifically superior western culture impressed Muslim intellectuals, they grew more open to the values that these cultures brought with them.

Finger-pointing at “the West” is a comfortable answer for everyone, but it is all the more important to realise that the fate of the Muslim woman cannot be divorced from the fate of the Muslim community as a whole. The retraction of women from the public sphere is also the result of fear. “Islam’s current cultural insecurity has been bad for both its scholarship and its women,” says Shaykh Akram. “Our traditions have grown weak, and w h e n people are weak, they grow cautious. When they are cautious, they don’t give their women freedoms.” Man’s desire to protect women has gone into overdrive, to the point that it has actually undermined the quality of Muslim communities. When the few women that do break free begin to propagate extreme brands of feminism, the result is a vicious circle of suspicion, fear and oppression.
The revelation of the 8,000 strong history of Muslim women scholars will prompt a variety of reactions from various parties. Misogynists are likely to deny it and attempt to undermine its authenticity. Feminists will be pleased that someone has done the hard work for them. Yet the best lesson is most likely to be found in the motivation behind its writing. Shaykh Akram seeks to bring people back to traditional Islam with the purpose of demonstrating that Islam is not misogynistic and nor were early male scholars biased against women. Accusations that his study encourages free-mixing and the relaxing of modesty are unfounded. It is clear in the introduction to the 40 volumes that the hijab is also the sunnah of the Prophet and “enables women to be present and visible in the public space in a way that is safe and dignified.” Here Shaykh Akram’s status as a learned alim from a prestigious institution (Nadwat al Ulama in Lucknow, India) who has studied Islam in the traditional way stands him in good stead; scholars including Shaykh Yusuf al Qaradawi have been more than willing to acknowledge his research and findings.

The irony of our forgotten women scholars is that they spent their lives in the pursuit of historical facts, whereas Muslims have long forgotten the fact of their contribution. Historical criticism is a fundamental principle in Islam. The Qur’an requires “O believers! If any iniquitous person comes to you with a slanderous tale, verify it, lest you hurt people unwittingly…” (49:6) Questioning the media frenzy on Islam is not just a good idea, but a religious obligation for Muslims to seek out the truth.

Once we have acknowledged the true historical record, that women are not subjugated by Islam and have played a part since the very beginning, we must also move on. Islam was not revealed as a bundle of doctrines delineating women’s rights, human rights or animal rights. Islam confers all of these rights and duties on us when we sincerely accept Allah’s rights. Faith, and not bare-knuckled rationality, permits us to create a society where everyone can have their rights upheld t h r o u g h submission to His Word and His messengers. Centuries of accusations of misogynism have been internalised and turned into reality, making Muslims themselves believe that Islam is fl awed. In a world where some women are kept locked in their homes while others are vying to become presidents, Shaykh Akram’s research should present us with some confidence in the justice of Islam. Not because it proves that Islam has had many women scholars – but that there were many great scholars that happened to be women.

Originally posted on emel.comMehrunisha Suleman and Afaaf Rajbee report.

Polygamy in Islam – The Marriages of Prophet Muhammad — Verse By Verse Qur’an Study Circle

Our beloved Prophet salAllahu ‘alayhi wa sallam is often criticized for having more than one wife. A man having excellent virtues as himself was not sent to the world for any other purpose than spreading Islam, purifying the people and teaching the Qur’an. He, by his word and deed, made the teachings of Islam radiate all over […]

via Polygamy in Islam – The Marriages of Prophet Muhammad — Verse By Verse Qur’an Study Circle

Being a True Servant of Al-Haqq

The name, Al-Haqq, is one of the ninety-nine beautiful names of Allah (ta’ala) and it means “The Truth”.

Allah (ta’ala) mentions the name in the Quran, and in one place, He says: “For that is Allah, your Lord, the Truth. And what can be beyond truth except error? So how are you averted?” (Quran 10:32)

Many times when we see the names and attributes of Allah (ta’ala), what comes to your mind is the promise that whoever memorizes them will enter Jannah.

But beyond their benefit when memorized, knowing the names and their meanings serves more purposes for us as Muslims.

We know that Allah (ta’ala) is the Truth. But how do we apply this knowledge in our own lives? How do we live as servants of “The Truth” such that we are an embodiment of this attribute?

Believe that Allah is True

A Muslim is someone who believes in Allah, the five articles of faith, etc. This belief in Allah (ta’ala) also translates to a belief in the truthfulness of the existence of Allah (ta’ala), as well as a belief in His supremacy.

As a true servant of Al-Haqq, you should believe that Allah (ta’ala) exists. You should believe in all His attributes, His signs, creations, and promises. Being true servants of Al-Haqq means that we don’t lend ourselves to doubting if there is a God or not. It means that we don’t doubt those things that are in the realm of the unseen, spending our time wondering about the possibility of there not being a Day of Judgment. And it also means that we believe everything that Allah (ta’ala) has told us about Himself in the Quran and through His Messenger (SAW)

“That is because Allah is the Truth, and that what they call upon other than Him is falsehood, and because Allah is the Most High, the Grand.” (Quran 31:30)

With this, a true servant of Al-Haqq believes that Allah (ta’ala) is the only true God and that everything He has told us is true.

Whenever the Prophet (ﷺ) offered the night (Tahajjud) prayer, he used to say, “O Allah! All the Praises are for You; You are the Light of the Heavens and the Earth. And all the Praises are for You; You are the Keeper of the Heavens and the Earth. All the Praises are for You; You are the Lord of the Heavens and the Earth and whatever is therein. You are the Truth, and Your Promise is the Truth, and Your Speech is the Truth, and meeting You is the Truth, and Paradise is the Truth and Hell (Fire) is the Truth and all the prophets are the Truth and the Hour is the Truth. O Allah! I surrender to You, and believe in You, and depend upon You, and repent to You, and in Your cause I fight and with Your orders I rule. So please forgive my past and future sins and those sins which I did in secret or in public. It is You Whom I worship, None has the right to be worshipped except You .” (Bukhari)

Be Truthful in Your Affairs

The literal meaning of Haqq is “truth,” and a Muslim who wants to reflect this attribute should strive to be truthful in their own lives.

Being truthful means that you do not tell lies and you do not give false witness. It means that you do not say things the way that they haven’t happened. All of these can seem like what you would tell a toddler, but the reality is that we have gotten comfortable with lies in all the different forms that it manifests.

People tell what they regard as “small lies” just to get out of uncomfortable situations. You tell your buddy that you are on your way when you are actually just getting into the shower. Or you sell an item without letting the buyer know the hidden defects. Or distort the truth to suit your own agenda, and make promises even when you have no intention of fulfilling them.

Whatever your excuse for lying, or for not saying the truth as it should be, remember that lying is a sin and that the true servant of Al-Haqq speaks the truth no matter how uncomfortable.

“It is obligatory for you to tell the truth, for truth leads to virtue and virtue leads to Paradise, and the man who continues to speak the truth and endeavours to tell the truth is eventually recorded as truthful with Allah, and beware of telling of a lie for telling of a lie leads to obscenity and obscenity leads to Hell-Fire, and the person who keeps telling lies and endeavours to tell a lie is recorded as a liar with Allah.” (Muslim)

You may also like: 5 Ways to Give Sadaqah Apart From Money

Encourage Others Towards the Truth

The responsibility of speaking the truth also involves us encouraging others towards the truth. The Messenger of Allah (SAW) was not only known for his truthfulness, he was also known for encouraging others to speak the truth.

Encouraging others to speak the truth means raising your children to recognize the importance of being truthful as Muslims. It means advising people when you have caught them in a lie, and it also means standing up in the face of what is not the truth.

The last option, standing up in the face of what is not true, may be the most difficult for us to do. Especially when the situation does not concern us. But it is also one of the most important. Because in our societies nowadays, many problems have occurred because of people’s lies going unchallenged.

Families have been torn apart, communities broken and people’s lives ruined because people who are not truthful have not been cautioned.

As servants of Al-Haqq, we know the truth, and we have a duty to guard it. Call people to the truth of Islam and also call them to speaking the truth in everything they say.

Do this verbally and also do it with your actions. Because when people have come to know you as a truthful person, they become endeared to you and can become influenced by your character.

Originally shared by Quran Academy

Looking Through My Window

Looking Through My Window

Many a long hour I sit in my chair
The window open to let in God’s good
It’s a picturesque view for all to see
Especially the lovely,

Tall ash tree
In the spring it was late starting to sprout
But at last the buds just opened out
Now it is standing majestic and tall
Covered in green leaves,

From which the birds call
I watch it each day in the breeze blowing
Without human aid it simply keeps growing
Telling us God’s help is always there
For everyone who really cares
So look out of your window,

All day long
Then you will feel like singing a song
Of thanks and praise for the one above
Giving us everything,

Especially His love

Source: Looking Through My Window